Category Archives: Medical Use – CBD

Hemp Industries Association Files Petition Against DEA

Hemp Industries Association Files Petition Against DEA to Defend Lawful Hemp-Derived Products from Agency Overreach
19 Jan 2017 5:41 PM

Suit Seeks to Defend Hemp Farmers, U.S. Businesses and Consumers from Illegal Attempt to Schedule Non-Psychoactive Hemp Derivatives as ‘Marihuana Extract’
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Hemp Industries Association (HIA), the leading non-profit trade association consisting of hundreds of hemp businesses, filed a Petition for Review on January 13, 2017, in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco, seeking to block the implementation of the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) recently announced Final Rule regarding “Marihuana Extract.” The proposed DEA Final Rule attempts to unlawfully designate hemp-derived non-psychoactive cannabinoids, including cannabidiol, as “marihuana extract,” and append the Controlled Substances Act to add all cannabinoids to its Schedule I. Furthermore, this action by the DEA contravenes clear Congressional intent and legal parameters for the production and consumption of hemp-derived products containing cannabinoids, enacted by Sec. 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Farm Bill).

To read the full petition, please visit:

https://hoban.law/sites/default/files/2017-01/17.01.13%20Petition%20%5Bfinal%5D.pdf

The DEA does not have the authority to augment the Controlled Substances Act; that power resides with Congress. Congress has clearly mandated, through the 2014 Farm Bill and the 2016 Omnibus Spending Law that the Controlled Substances Act does not apply to hemp grown in state pilot programs, and that it is a violation of federal law for agencies such as DEA to interfere with these programs. The DEA’s proposed rule regarding cannabinoids thumbs its nose at Congress and threatens to undermine the market for legal hemp products containing cannabinoids, including those produced in the U.S. under state laws that regulate hemp cultivation and processing pursuant to, and in accordance with the federal Farm Bill. These products, such as hemp foods and supplements, fall outside the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and are not subject to regulatory control by the DEA.

“Hemp-derived products containing cannabinoids are an increasingly in-demand category within the hemp market—and U.S. consumers constitute the largest market for hemp products worldwide,” said Colleen Keahey, Executive Director of the Hemp Industries Association. “We are committed to defending the rights of our members, of entrepreneurial hemp farmers, businesses and consumers, who all are acting entirely within the legal framework of the CSA and Farm Bill, including those adversely affected by trying to source American-grown hemp and hemp derivatives to supply this demand. The DEA’s attempt to regulate hemp derived products containing cannabinoids lawfully sourced under the CSA, and farmed and produced under the Farm Bill in states like Kentucky and Colorado, is not only outside the scope of their power, it’s an attempt to rob us of hemp’s economic opportunity.”
The DEA has made previous attempts to interfere with legal hemp products, notably from 2001-2003 when the agency contended that hemp food products such as cereals, hemp seed and hemp oil, are a Schedule I substance due to trace insignificant residues of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. On February 6, 2004, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in response that hemp is not included in Schedule I; that the trace THC in such products is similar to trace opiates in poppy seed bagels, and does not render them controlled substances. The HIA believes this 2004 ruling sets strong legal precedent for the current petition, which asserts that cannabinoids derived from lawful portions and varieties of the Cannabis plant exempted from control under the CSA and through the Farm Bill, may not be regulated as “marihuana” or “marihuana extract” by the DEA.

More recently, in 2014, the DEA interfered with the implementation of state pilot programs for hemp farming, when the agency unlawfully seized 250 lbs. of certified industrial hemp seed imported from Italy. The viable hemp seed had been legally sourced to supply six hemp research projects licensed by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and coordinated in conjunction with Kentucky State academic institutions. The seed was quickly released, following the filing of a lawsuit against the DEA on May 14, 2014 by then Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner, now U.S. Congressional Representative James Comer.
“Over a decade ago, the Ninth Circuit held that non-psychoactive hemp is not controlled by the CSA,” said Patrick Goggin, co-counsel for the HIA. “The DEA is again attempting to schedule under the CSA cannabinoids and non-psychoactive hemp beyond its authority. We believe the Ninth Circuit will invalidate this rule just like it did in 2004.”
To date, 31 states have passed hemp legislation that allows their farmers to cultivate hemp according to guidelines set forth in the Farm Bill. Per these guidelines, U.S. farmers planted nearly 10,000 acres of hemp in 2016. Farmers and agri-business across the country have invested many millions of dollars in infrastructure to comply with federal law; this retroactive misreading of statute puts the livelihood of these law-abiding companies and individuals at risk.
Recent DEA pronouncements indicate that DEA is threatening to flout prior court rulings, and assert regulatory authority over hemp seed, oil, and products made from hemp seed and oil, which have always been exempt from the Controlled Substances Act. HIA continues to monitor these developments, and will consider further actions to resist DEA’s unlawful attempts to regulate legal hemp products.
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The Hemp Industries Association (HIA) represents the interests of the hemp industry and encourages the research and development of new hemp products. More information about hemp’s many uses and hemp advocacy may be found at www.TheHIA.org.

New U.S. Agriculture policy could halt some Kentucky hemp growth

 

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By Charles Mason, Bowling Green Daily News,

Possibly half of Kentucky’s nascent industrial hemp industry could be harmed by a policy suggestion offered by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Thomas Vilsack and other federal officials.

The policy suggestion is part of a larger discussion over the future of industrial hemp in America, which exists in legal limbo. States with legislation in place can allow it be grown under research conditions, but cannabis is still outlawed as a controlled substance.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said Thursday that Kentucky is the biggest industrial hemp state in the United States.

“We want Kentucky to be the epicenter for industrial hemp,” Quarles said during a telephone interview.

This set of paragraphs in a federal publication has created some concerns about the future viability of Kentucky’s program.

“The term ‘industrial hemp’ includes the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part or derivative of such plant, including seeds of such plant, whether growing or not, that is used exclusively for industrial purposes (fiber and seed) with a tetrahydrocannabinols concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis,” according to the “Statement of Principles on Industrial Hemp” released Aug. 12 in the Federal Register.

Under the parameters, the feds would redefine industrial hemp to include only “historically proven” applications – fiber and seed – excluding other potential applications. The statement from the feds – which is not legally binding – goes on to say that ‘‘tetrahydrocannabinols includes all isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers of tetrahydrocannabinols.”

The Federal Register statement also noted, “… 2014 legalized the growing and cultivating of industrial hemp for research purposes in states where such growth and cultivation is legal under state law, notwithstanding existing federal statutes that would otherwise criminalize such conduct.”

The language in the Federal Register also has a Louisville businessman concerned.

Chad Wilson of Bowling Green, who has a business in Louisville, admits it is early in the process of these national discussions. He sees the Kentucky family farmer and his or her crop options being endangered by the federal policy suggestion.

Wilson is the marketing director for Green Remedy of Louisville, which distributes natural remedies derived from non-industrial hemp applications.

“We created this Kentucky company to help the Kentucky farmer,” Wilson said Thursday during a telephone interview. “We have a right to a better quality of life.”

Kentucky permits 167 research plots for industrial hemp by growers not affiliated with an educational institution and the about 2,200 acres planted is expected to grow in the coming years. Kentucky’s research pilot program is in its third growing season. The program exists because the current Farm Bill offers an exemption to allow the research plots, Quarles said.

“We are trying to create stability for the investors. They are concerned about this policy paper,” Quarles said of the state’s industrial hemp program.

Quarles recently wrote Vilsack and other federal officials to express concerns about the federal government’s approach to narrow Congress’ definition of industrial hemp.

That approach excludes cannabidiol (CBD), which advocates claim has health benefits. Green Remedy’s products derive from CBD.

Quarles said more than half of the industrial hemp acreage cultivated this year by pilot program participants in Kentucky is being used to harvest CBD.

“Freedom, flexibility and latitude to try new methods and applications are essential to the success of any agricultural research pilot program. Industrial hemp research pilot programs are now different,” Quarles wrote Vilsack; Deputy Assistant Administrator Louis Milione of the federal Drug Enforcement Agency; and Associate Commissioner Leslie Kux of the federal Food and Drug Administration on Sept. 12.

The Federal Register statement noted that the USDA, DEA and FDA were still sorting out legalities of permitted industrial hemp programs authorized by states.

The statement wasn’t all potential bad news for Kentucky.

Quarles applauded the decision to allow hemp growers and processors to be eligible for federal loans, grants and other programs.

However, he took exception with the narrowed definition that would shut out non-industrial hemp product applications such as use of hemp parts as food ingredients, as materials for artistic use; or as ingredients for pharmaceutical, nutraceutical or other health-related purposes.

Quarles told the federal administrator that CBD shows “great promise” as an economically viable agricultural product.

“Kentucky’s General Assembly is one of many state legislatures that has expressed their support for continuing and expanding CBD applications and research,” Quarles wrote.

The CBD portion of the plant is the backbone of Wilson’s three-year-old company. Wilson said he used to look at cannabis in the narrow view of marijuana and people getting high, but through personal education about industrial hemp and its non-industrial medicinal applications, “they call me the hemp preacher now,” he said Thursday in a telephone interview.

Green Remedy has less than five employees and Wilson declines to cite specifically what his business is worth except to say that he’s made a “substantial investment” and contracted growers to provide the CBD his business uses.

“This is an opportunity for the middle class to step up and start a business,” Wilson said. “You don’t do something like this and then pull the rug out.”

Wilson and Quarles are both concerned that foreign hemp seed might transcend domestic efforts.

The Statement of Principles calls for prohibiting transfers of hemp seeds and plants across state lines, despite Congress’ “clear intent” to allow such interstate transfers, Quarles noted in the letter.

“I cannot understand why the importation rules should be more restrictive for interstate transfers than for international transfers,” Quarles wrote.

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RELATED:

Because CBDs are being investigated by drug companies, the FDA has granted CBDs status as being “investigated as a new drug.”

the first year of state-sanctioned industrial hemp farming under the Farm Bill succeeded, and the pilot program’s second year promises to be bigger and better

On May 5th 2015, James Comer, Commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA), held a press conference in a Lexington-based tobacco facility belonging to G.F. Vaughan, the last remaining tobacco processor in Kentucky.

His message was historic, his location symbolic: the first year of state-sanctioned industrial hemp farming under the Farm Bill succeeded, and the pilot program’s second year promises to be bigger and better, with the potential to elevate the entire state economy by restoring industrial hemp as the new “cash crop.”

Specifically, Commissioner Comer announced that KDA had approved 121 total participants, including seven universities, over 1,724 acres — a significant increase from last year.   Additionally, millions of dollars have been invested in the state’s emerging industrial hemp production and processing industries.

The revival of industrial hemp means that Kentucky is creating a new agricultural commodity market, attracting an infusion of private-sector money from both inside and outside the state.  By giving farmers, suppliers and processors the ability to hire additional staff and join the vanguard of the global resurgence in industrial hemp, Kentucky is empowering a return to its past agricultural leadership.

Kentucky is once again the American heartland of industrial hemp culture, a title it proudly held throughout history before Prohibition. But it wouldn’t have gotten here if not for the determination of its political leadership, starting with Comer himself.  He was an early advocate of legalizing industrial hemp and worked with thought leaders from both parties to win support, joining with the rich Kentucky leadership of Rand Paul, Mitch McConnell, Thomas Massie, Paul Hornback, John Yarmouth, and Andy Barr to move to action.

In 2014, these pilot programs were legitimized under the Farm Bill (aka The Agricultural Act of 2014).  Given the tough economic times, and particularly the economic plight of farmers, Comer’s Kentucky Proud strategy for a sustainable crop made perfect sense.  But politics intervened, and as the first 250-pound shipment of certified industrial hemp seeds from Italy arrived at the Louisville airport, the DEA seized them as if they were contraband, in direct violation of the new law.

Where others may have cowered before the federal authorities, Comer filed suit against the DEA, asserting his state’s rights to carry out its industrial hemp program. Realizing that they overstepped their bounds, the DEA released the seeds in time for planting: Jamie Comer’s quick action saved the 2014 industrial hemp growing season, setting the stage for the dramatic increase in the 2015 planting season.

GenCanna Global: Setting the Industry Standard

Hemp Project

“Young hemp plant; Source GenCanna Global”

All pilot programs in Kentucky seek to move industrial hemp farming forward, but one in particular has lead the way: GenCanna Global and its Hemp Kentucky Project.

GenCanna, working with its strategic local partners, immediately distinguished themselves by establishing the state’s first dedicated analytical laboratory in Lexington.  Since compliance with potency levels is vitally important, regulators from KDA and scientists from universities were invited into the lab to observe and confer.  The Hemp Kentucky Project is compiling significant internal data for use in future agricultural production decisions.

The Hemp Kentucky Project now employs over 40 people at facilities in Jackson and Garrard Counties.  Close working relationships with nursery and farming families have led to high expectations for the 2015 outdoor season.  Because GenCanna specializes in industrial hemp with high CBD (Cannabidiol), it is necessary to have defined protocols at all stages of the growth and processing cycle.  This new-aged approach to the ancient industrial hemp cultivation and production techniques has been enabled by the quick adoption of modern standards at both locations.

CEO Matty Mangone-Miranda quoted “ between our strategic partners with local nurseries and farms, our scientific research, and breeding and seed development at our Hemp Campus, we are literally seeding this agricultural revolution in Kentucky.  The ability to produce large amounts of CBD will fundamentally alter the supply available for both the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries.  This Hemp Kentucky Proud effort will catapult locals into the forefront of industrial hemp production nationally.”

GenCanna is drawing on the great availability of different farming techniques to properly understand all aspects of repurposing existing farm assets to its unique high CBD industrial hemp.  As Chris Stubbs, GenCanna’s Chief Scientific Officer, puts it “the GenCanna Production Platform (GPP) assures the standardized, repeatable quality from nursery to field to processing to formulation.”  Additionally, Chris adds “the GPP ensures our mutual responsibilities with respect to staying within the letter and intent of the laws under which we operate.  We couldn’t be more pleased with the leadership and understanding that the Kentucky Department of Agriculture has shown.”

GenCanna is not alone in its efforts.  Their strategic partner, Atalo Holdings, is the largest growing cultivation in the entire pilot program with over 30 farming partners.  Atalo and GenCanna are teaming up to repurpose a former tobacco seed development facility, conveniently located in the midst of the traditional industrial hemp heartland.  This new facility, a Hemp Campus, will be a research center that will attract companies and scientists from around the world to develop knowledge of CBD and create a vast inventory of Kentucky-developed, American-certified hemp seed cultivars.

As the industrial hemp production of large amounts of CBD becomes a probability, globally renowned research scientists are noticing.  Dr. Mark Rosenfeld, CEO of ISA Scientific, an American-based group of medical experts and cannabinoid scientists with direct ties to Israel and China talked about the partnering with GenCanna and the Hemp Kentucky Project as it “paves the way for substantial improvements in treating chronic, debilitating, and life-threatening health conditions that not only afflict many Kentuckians, but hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Part of the reason why we have a global scale of what we do.”

ISA Scientific’s Dr. Perry Fine (whose roots are in Lexington) spoke of how the GenCanna-ISA partnership will immediately work on treating diabetes and chronic pain with pharmaceutical-grade CBD therapies that are affordable and accessible.

Through its Hemp Kentucky Project, GenCanna and its strategic partners are working collaboratively to produce large quantities of CBD diversified over multiple farms in Kentucky.  COO Steve Bevan, recognizing the sizable capital investments in nurseries and farms, insists that empowering farmers to “help commoditize the production of CBD such that a sustainable agricultural industry can develop to literally produce for both the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical markets.  We are creating jobs, research, facility development, and industry leadership, all which require the human capital necessary to make this happen,  Steve suggests that “we’re going to need workers, technicians, accountants, support staff, scientists, everybody. And we’re going to find each of those people right here in Kentucky.”

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Waiting for American Green Inc (OTCMKTS:ERBB) 0

By Justin Kinney on May 20, 2015 Media & Technology, Micro Cap Insider

American Green Inc (OTCMKTS:ERBB) continues to drop farther below $0.01 after eclipsing that support level. The stock does still have a loyal shareholder base that are waiting for a reversal.

On May 5 ERBB said the first of five ZaZZZ machines currently slated for Kentucky made headlines at the state’s Industrial Hemp Pilot Program Update in Lexington.

Agriculture Commissioner James Comer of the Kentucky Department of Agriculture invited American Green marketing partner Chris Smith of Green Remedy to talk about the future of hemp in the Bluegrass State. Green Remedy, which is comprised of John Salsman, Mike Boone, Chad Wilson, as well as Chris Smith is currently located in Bardstown, KY. They ordered five ZaZZZ machines in February 2015, the first of which was delivered, wrapped and shown off to the public today.

American Green Inc (OTCMKTS:ERBB) ZaZZZ vending machine is a unique automated vending solution designed specifically around American Green’s licensed proprietary patented technology. The machine is designed to make age-verified vending of cannabis products a reality, by providing a layer of authorization using the same systems as pharmacies for purchase regulation. It is designed to facilitate fully unattended purchases inside a dispensary or other regulated cannabis establishment.

The Company launched the ZaZZZ earlier this year in Colorado at a medical marijuana dispensary called Herbal Elements in Eagle Veil. Several days ago AG announced that zazzznetwork.com was online and displaying the first locations to have the age-verifying ZaZZZ product fulfillment machines fully online.

Currently the zazzznetwork.com shows ZaZZZ vending machine installed at Hempful Farms, Inc., in Phoenix, Arizona, AG HQ in Tempe, Arizona, Nature’s Kiss in EngleWood, Colorado, Kind Therapeutics in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Rocky Mountain Miracles in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Natural Herbal Pain Relief in San Jose, California, Pacific Coast in Seattle, Washington, Seattle Caregivers in Seattle, Washington and The Peoples ChampZ in Seattle, Washington.

Carl Kaiser, VP of the Verified Vending division said “As our ZaZZZ machine network expands to more locations, we plan to never stop incorporating new features and improvements. Catering to the early adopters, we left the product selection mostly to their discretion. As we progress, we’ll eventually direct the product selection so ZaZZZ Machines arrive with the images loaded and the inventory available and accounted for. Thus, the sixteen square feet in some random corner of the seller’s facility that currently is occupied by an unused chair and a poster on the wall instantly transforms into revenue-generating floor space for the business.”

 

ERBB is the brainchild of CEO Stephan Shearin who also serves as ERBB COO. Mr. Shearin has over 15 years of Internet business experience and over 20 years of start-up experience. He graduated from Arizona State University with a Degree in sociology and previously owned an underwater video business on St Thomas and an online bank.

On March 31 ERBB announced a Collaboration Agreement with Endexx to jointly develop the “Access Control Identification & Verification Vending Platform” aka “ACIDVP.” Each company designs and markets systems to address the issues related to the automated dispensing and inventory control of products requiring eligibility verification in compliance with applicable laws for the Marijuana Industry.

Together, they will co-develop and license an Integration and Connectivity Interface Platform to foster required industry standardization. The on-going collaboration also enables the companies to share business relationships leading directly to mutual revenue potential for both organizations.

The scope of the collaboration comprises the establishment of a unified compliance standard for inventory control and verified vending for general adoption by regulators and local jurisdictions in multiple legal markets.

The agreement also calls for collaboration on technology connectivity with the integration of American Green’s “Verify Pay” POS (Point of Sale) system with Endexx’s proprietary M3Hub inventory control, tracking, and process management system and for the joint development, marketing, distribution and licensing of the M3Hub universal interface connectivity platform for all third party “Seed-to-Sale,” POS systems and vending solutions.

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SC mom legally making and selling strain of medical marijuana

By Molly Grantham

 

 

South Carolina (WBTV) –

We can’t tell you where in South Carolina we are reporting this story. It’s down a dirt road, near horses and smack in the middle of a large field.

“I’m building my company here,” Janel Ralph says. “I think it’ll be up and running in maybe six months.” She laughs, “But I’m an optimist. I guess I can’t say exactly on the timeline.”

Janel Ralph’s company is called Palmetto Synergistic Research. She’ll be manufacturing hemp cannabis, legally, in South Carolina. She’s cultivating them to have specific genetics. What she’s making will be high in CBD – the part of the plant that is calming – and to have very little to no THC – the part of the plant that gives you that euphoric “high” feeling.

The result will be plants that will make CBD oil, a strain of medical marijuana.

How is this legal?

There is a hemp bill in South Carolina (S839) that allows for consumable hemp products with a profile of .3% or less of THC. Because of the bill, those “consumable products” aren’t considered marijuana, as defined by the State.

**SEE THE FULL BILL HERE**

Still, because of the controversy surrounding the word “marijuana”, Ralph would only do an interview on the condition we’d keep the location secret.

"There will be people who would intentionally try to steal it not knowing that it’s hemp,” she said. “Criminals could hear I’m manufacturing medical marijuana and think they could take it. They wouldn’t understand what I’m making has such a low THC, that even if they took the plants they couldn’t smoke it or sell it as marijuana. You can’t get high on what I’m making.”

Insurance also requires anonymity, but Ralph admits the secrecy is mostly for safety reasons.

“I’m doing something new and that scares people sometimes. So there’s a fear in it for me,” she said. “Ever since starting all this it has been a fear."

Ralph started this process last year because of her own 5-year-old daughter, Harmony.

Harmony has a genetic condition called lissencephaly. Ralph says that means her brain is missing a deletion of one of her chromosomes and causes lots of seizures. After multiple other medications weren’t working, her mother wanted to try CBD oils.

“I knew CBD oil could be beneficial, yet, it was so hard to get,” Ralph said. “There’s an underground black market for this medicine. I know people who were getting products that weren’t what they were promised. I was able to find some for Harmony, and it worked. She was doing great! But then my supply started dwindling. I was scared to death. I thought at one point, ‘Oh my God, I’m going to have to cold turkey my daughter in taking this away.’”

She did have to take Harmony off of CBD oil. Ralph says at that point, Harmony started regressing.

“So I said, ‘Forget this. I’m done. I’m doing it myself’, she says. “I was just so frustrated. We’re talking about a hemp product. Let’s be real. This is CBD oil. CBD oil! It’s not a product high in THC. And yet, I couldn’t find it to give to my daughter. I was constantly begging people out in areas where it’s legal to find what they could and give it to us. Like some ‘Mommy Network.’ And it just got to the point where I was the one who needed this for my child, so I realized either I do it myself or sit back and be taken advantage of.”

She was determined to do it legally.

South Carolina’s vague hemp oil law says you can have CBD oils, but doesn’t say how you should or where you can get them. (North Carolina’s current law, signed by the Governor in July of 2014 and put into effect in October, says they can only be prescribed through four hospitals in the state, and only through pilot studies.)

But that wasn’t the main problem. Ralph said her issue with South Carolina’s bill was a separate part that said you can manufacture CBD oils if you’re a “licensed grower." It just doesn’t define or say what kind of license you need.

“I started by contacting local law enforcement. I asked, ‘What do I need to do to grow hemp for medicinal value?’” She laughs. “I wanted to do it all on the up-and-up. Only, law enforcement had no idea.”

Ultimately she was told law enforcement has no jurisdiction. She says it was recommended she contact the Agricultural Department. But that department wasn’t sure either.

Throughout her research, Ralph realized South Carolina had cut-and-pasted much of its hemp oil bill from Kentucky’s hemp oil bill, which is a little more specific. So Ralph went to Kentucky, found a grower there who was “licensed” through the Agriculture Department in Kentucky, made him ten percent part business owner with her, and has now been able to tell South Carolina legislature – in multiple appearances before state representatives – she is following the law.

“I want to be compliant,” Ralph says. “I am not a criminal. I don’t want to be a criminal. I want to be transparent.”

Every time she looks at her daughter, she knows the intense efforts are worthwhile.

“Our hearts are in this,” she said. “This has been a terrible process. I’m in debt. I’m stressed. But there’s no other way. Everyone involved in my company has a child who can benefit from this medicine. We want this. We want this for our kids.”

Ralph says until her 25,000 square-foot greenhouse and 2,500 square-foot processing facility are built in the field where she talked to WBTV, she is making the CBD oil at a facility legally-approved by the Agriculture Department.

“We have 65 customers already,” she said. “Kids and adults.”

To find out more on Palmetto Harmony – the name of the CBD oil she’s making – or to contact Ralph, go to her company website here.

She says it also recently started being sold at two places in South Carolina – a store called Eucalyptus Wellness in Charleston and Emily McSherry, a licensed massage therapist.

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A Beginner’s Guide to Hemp Oil, the Cannabis Product That’s Legal Right Now

 

 

By Hannah Sentenac Thu., May 29 2014 at 7:00 AM

With medical marijuana on everyone’s lips (in more ways than one), people are buzzing about weed, hemp, cannabis, THC, CBD, and all kinds of other related terms that you might or might not understand. It’s OK — this is confusing stuff.

Leave it to Cultist to offer a little clarity about one such topic you’re probably hearing a lot about: hemp oil. From "cannamoms" to Whole Foods salespeople, lots of folks are touting the benefits of this product. But what is it, exactly, and what does it do?

See also: How to Become a Medical Marijuana Millionaire in Ten Easy Steps

So what is this stuff?
Let’s start with what hemp oil is not. It is not marijuana. It does not get people high. Both originate from the same plant, but marijuana is cultivated for the buds (which have to be carefully raised for that specific purpose). They’re also grown differently.

The oil has only trace amounts of THC, the psychotropic component in weed. Instead, it has higher concentrations of cannabidiol, or CBD, which is the medicinal boon people are all atwitter over.

"You’ll see two kinds — hemp oil drawn from the plant and hemp oil drawn from the seeds. Ours is drawn from the mature stalks of the hemp plant," says Andrew Hard, director of public relations for HempMeds, a California company whose hemp oil products are sold all over the world. The stalk and seeds don’t fall under the definition of what the U.S. government dubs marijuana, he says; that’s why the products are legal in all 50 states.

Aw, man. So it won’t get me stoned?
Sorry, man. Let’s put it this way: The medical marijuana bill that recently passed the Florida House would allow patients with cancer and conditions that result in chronic seizures or severe muscle spasms to use marijuana pills, oils, or vapors that contain 0.8 percent THC or lower and 10 percent CBD or higher. Right now, those things are illegal.

HempMeds’ Real Scientific Hemp Oil (RSHO), as a comparison, has 15.5 to 25 percent CBD by volume but only trace amounts of THC.

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U.S. House of Representatives Votes to Legalize Industrial Hemp

 

 

WhiteHouse

The U.S. House of Representatives voted 225-200 on June 20 to legalize the industrial farming of hemp fiber. Hemp is the same species as the marijuana plant, and its fiber has been used to create clothing, paper, and other industrial products for thousands of years; however, it has been listed as a “controlled substance” since the beginning of the drug war in the United States. Unlike marijuana varieties of the plant, hemp is not bred to create high quantities of the drug THC.

The amendment’s sponsor, Jared Polis (D-Colo.), noted in congressional debate that “George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp. The first American flag was made of hemp. And today, U.S. retailers sell over $300 million worth of goods containing hemp — but all of that hemp is imported, since farmers can’t grow it here. The federal government should clarify that states should have the ability to regulate academic and agriculture research of industrial hemp without fear of federal interference. Hemp is not marijuana, and at the very least, we should allow our universities — the greatest in the world — to research the potential benefits and downsides of this important agricultural commodity.”

The 225-200 vote included 62 Republican votes for the Polis amendment, many of whom were members of Justin Amash’s Republican Liberty Caucus or representatives from farm states. But most Republicans opposed the amendment, claiming it would make the drug war more difficult. “When you plant hemp alongside marijuana, you can’t tell the difference,” Representative Steve King (R-Iowa) said in congressional debate on the amendment to the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013.

“This is not about a drugs bill. This is about jobs,” Representative Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) countered King in House floor debate June 20. Massie, a key House Republican ally of Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky and a member of the Republican Liberty Caucus, opposes marijuana legalization but had signed on as a cosponsor of the Polis amendment.

The amendment would take industrial hemp off the controlled substances list if it meets the following classification: “The term ‘industrial hemp’ means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.” The amendment would allow industrial farming of hemp “if a person grows or processes Cannabis sativa L. for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with State law.” Most states have passed laws legalizing industrial hemp, in whole or in part, but federal prohibitions have kept the plant from legal cultivation.

However, the annual agricultural authorization bill subsequently went down to defeat in the House by a vote of 195 to 234. Sponsors of the amendment hope that it will be revised in conference committee, where it has strong support from both Kentucky senators, Rand Paul and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

The legislation, originally offered as the bill H.R. 525, was sponsored by Jared Polis (D-Colo.) and Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.), who represent states where voters recently considered ballot measures that legalized marijuana within their states, a fact King pointed out in House floor debate. Voters in Colorado and Washington approved the ballot measures in 2012, but voters in Oregon rejected a ballot measure that would have legalized cultivation of marijuana.

Recent polls have indicated that most Americans want legalization of marijuana, as well as hemp. Though support for marijuana legalization is by only a slim majority of the public, there’s a larger divide among age groups, with younger voters more heavily favoring legalization.

None of the debate on the amendment related to the constitutional authority of Congress to ban substances. Nor did any congressman reference the first time Congress banned a drug — alcohol. At that time, Congress followed proper constitutional protocol to amend the U.S. Constitution first, giving it the legitimate power to ban alcohol (i.e., the 18th Amendment). No comparable constitutional amendment has been passed for hemp, marijuana, raw milk, or any other substance prohibited by the federal government.

Medical Marijuana Bill Stalled in Committee

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana Bill Stalled in Committee

 

3/11/2012 10:23 AM EDT Tags: drugs, assembly, sb129, marijuana

A long awaited and much needed medical marijuana bill has finally been filed in the Kentucky Assembly. State Senate Bill 129, the Gatewood Galbraith Memorial Medical Marijuana Act was filed on January 31, 2012 by Senator Perry Clark of Louisville. The bill is simply written. It reschedules marijuana in Kentucky from Schedule I dangerous and having no medical value, to Schedule II dangerous but having medical value. This allows physicians to prescribe the drug for qualifying conditions to be determined by the doctor. The bill allows for cultivation of 5 marijuana plants and possession of up to 5 ounces per month. The regulation of distribution is left up to the Pharmacy Board.

The bill caught activists and patients completely off guard. Activists have been writing and petitioning the Assembly for years to get this bill and they immediately sprang into action. They have been organizing over the internet and are pressing their own legislators and all the members of the Assembly individually and as a group to support and pass this legislation. Senator Kathy Stein of Lexington immediately signed on as co-sponsor and the bill has been sent to the Senate Judicial Committee where it has run into a bit of trouble. The Committee Chair, Senator Tom Jensen has so far refused to bring the measure up in committee. Without his calling up the bill it could be dead for this year. Senator Jensen has not been forthcoming with his reasons for holding up the bill. He could be thinking that the bill will die in committee and disappear. I’m afraid that is not going to happen. Now that a bill has finally been filed legislators can expect to see it from here on out till it becomes law. If a legislator wanted to get rid of this bill so he won’t have to deal with it, it might behoove him to get it over with rather than drag it out for another year or years, as could be the case.

After listening to Drug War propaganda for their entire lives I imagine there is some trepidation among legislators regarding their support for marijuana law reform but it is unfounded. There as yet has not been any type of voter backlash directed at legislators. With an approval rating of 81% in nationwide polls, medical marijuana legislation should not be controversial and patients should not have to wait another year to access this effective medicine.

The course of action for supporters of SB129 will be for them to prevail upon Senator Jensen to end his obstructionism and bring the bill up and pass it favorably out of committee. There can be no moral justification for the Assembly to not get this bill passed this year. For the members of the Assembly to ignore the suffering of our sick and disabled citizens and to make them suffer unnecessarily is appalling and a black mark against what should be a concerned and caring leadership.

Whatever the reason for the Judicial Committee not taking up SB129, the lack of action is sending a message to the citizens that their leaders are indifferent to their suffering. The Assembly may be able to wait another year , but those of our citizens with life threatening conditions might not be around when the Assembly finally gets to it.

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